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Wildlife

Money Hill is a Louisiana nature preservation site. It is rare that a developer makes the commitment to the environment that Money Hill has made. The developer and the community have won numerous awards related to exceptional commitment to the environment since 1996.

The small boxes strategically placed along the golf course are birding boxes. Fledglings hatched in these boxes are a wildlife resource to the Northshore. Bluebirds, wood ducks and more have been studied by national groups and are maintained by residents, with the guidance of local environmentalists.

The Nature Conservancy (TNC) is an international, non-profit organization dedicated to the conservation of natural habitats worldwide. It is more than 50 years old and has been active in Louisiana since 1987. In the intervening years, TNC has helped protect more than 300,000 acres in the state. Of those acres, 28,000 are on the Northshore where TNC owns and manages five nature preserves. The 840-acre Abita Creek Flatwoods Preserve is located south of Money Hill and is open to the public during daylight hours. It can be accessed from LA Highway 435. Visitors park at the front gate and hike on a scenic boardwalk and self-guided nature trail.

The Talisheek Pine Wetlands Preserve is located west of Money Hill and consists of nearly 3,000 acres. Originally purchased from Money Hill, this preserve contains a mosaic of pine savanna, bayhead swamp, slash pine, pond cypress and longleaf pine forest. Savannas are meadow-like grasslands characterized by a tremendous variety of plants and animals. Among the many types of grasses, sedges and wildflowers are bug-eating plants, native orchids, lilies and other distinctive flora. Savannas and other habitat types in the longleaf pine ecosystem are some of the most threatened ecosystems in North America. These areas are habitats for some rare animal species like the gopher tortoise, Bachman's sparrows and bald eagles. Those adorable squirrels you'll notice on the grounds with the white faces are Bachman's squirrels... something you won't see often on the Northshore or anyplace else. Residents and golfers are quick to point that they routinely spot wild turkey, deer and many other native animals here.

Get to know more about The Nature Conservancy at www.nature.org or by calling (985) 809-1414.